Monday, August 10, 2015

Trans Pacific Partnership and Intellectual Property Protection

On July 31, trade ministers from countries (including the U.S.) seeking a final draft of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) went home from Maui disappointed. Negotiations got hung up on a few things, especially intellectual property protection (patents) for pharmaceuticals.

The policy associated with the TPP that has been most controversial within the U.S. is Trade Promotion Authority (TPA or “Fast Track”). TPA is not a features of the treaty itself, but an entirely domestic policy defining the power of the Senate to ratify the agreement signed by the President’s men.

At NCPA, we were concerned that giving President Obama fast track authority would result in a poorly negotiated agreement, without adequate protection for intellectual property rights – the fuel of innovation. Congress went ahead and gave the president TPA, so all we can do is wait until we see what comes out of the hitherto confidential discussions.

There have been some positive signals that the administration is standing up for strong intellectual property rights. If that is why the negotiations broke up without a final agreement, then we should be glad to take a breather until other countries recognize the value of pharmaceutical patents like the U.S. does.

Read the entire entry at NCPA's Health Policy Blog.

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